Tyranny dating choice

(MORE: Why Restaurants and Valentine’s Day Don’t Mix) When Alice mentioned this predicament to me at a conference last week in Texas, she was echoing the growing sentiment that online-dating sites actually prevent people from finding long-term partners. The “tyranny of choice” theory posits that surrounded by too many options, we become paralyzed, overwhelmed and unable to make a decision.

Online dating is a very effective, efficient way of meeting the perfect partner.But only if you determine exactly what you want and you’ve developed some kind of framework — you can use doodles, or color-coded marks or whatever makes the most sense – to evaluate the data first.I know it may be a rare breed, but he must be a cultural, emotional, linguistic, intellectual, gastronomic, nonreligious Jew. (MORE: How Friendship Makes You More Successful) Once I had my list, I created a mathematical formula to assess each possible candidate before we went out on a date.A possible suitor had to reach a minimum threshold of 700 points for us to chat online or on the phone, and more points were required for us to meet in person.Increasingly, it seems, branding is running up against a wall of consumer resistance.

We can only process so many product choices in our minds.

When buying a big-ticket item – a car, a refrigerator, a camera – no one wants to make the “wrong” choice,” so we really bear down and do comparative research.

The fantasy takes shape that t magazine recently devoted three full pages to the “tyranny of choice,” in which the case is made that perhaps the proliferation of choice is actually an insidious form of servitude.

To wit: if you were to visit a grocery store with a list that simply read “meat, produce, dairy,” you’d have a hard time choosing and settling on the right items too. ) I believe that I was successful at finding the perfect person because I made an extremely granular and specific list, noting everything from acceptable attitudes toward work and sports to what type of jazz he should like.

In all, I had 72 attributes that I parsed into two sections: one was a top-tier list of 10 deal-breaker characteristics, and the other was a secondary tier of 15 important qualities I would demand in a partner. I need someone who was raised in a Jewish household.

The good news for everyone is that you can build immunity to the tyranny of choice.