Adult breast dating Internationsl dating

A 1995 realignment of the IDL made Caroline Island one of the first points of land on Earth to reach January 1, 2000 on the calendar (UTC 14).

internationsl dating-8

Proceeding from north to south, the first deviation of the IDL from 180° is to pass to the east of Wrangel Island and the Chukchi Peninsula, the easternmost part of Russian Siberia. Two US-owned uninhabited atolls, Howland Island and Baker Island, just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean (and ships at sea between 172.5°W and 180°), have the latest time on Earth (UTC-12 hour).(Wrangel Island lies directly on the meridian at 71°32′N 180°0′E, also noted as 71°32′N 180°0′W.) It then bends considerably west of 180°, passing west of St. The IDL circumscribes Kiribati by swinging far to the east, almost reaching the 150°W meridian.For example, at UTC Thursday, it is Wednesday in American Samoa (UTC-11), Thursday in most of the world, and Friday in Kiritimati (UTC 14).During the first hour (UTC –), all three calendar dates include inhabited places.The areas that are the first to see the daylight of a new day vary by the season.

Around the June solstice, the first area would be anyplace within the Kamchatka Time Zone (UTC 12) that is far enough north to experience midnight sun on the given date.

(See § Cartographic practice and convention below.) A person who goes around the world from east to west (the same direction as Magellan's voyage) would gain or set their clock back one hour for every 15° of longitude crossed, and would gain 24 hours for one circuit of the globe from east to west if they did not compensate by setting their clock forward one day when they crossed the IDL.

In contrast, a west-to-east circumnavigation of the globe loses an hour for every 15° of longitude crossed but gains back a day when crossing the IDL.

The International Date Line (IDL) is an imaginary line of navigation on the surface of the Earth that runs from the North Pole to the South Pole and demarcates the change of one calendar day to the next.

It passes through the middle of the Pacific Ocean, roughly following the 180° line of longitude but deviating to pass around some territories and island groups. (Times are approximate, since time zone boundaries generally do not exactly coincide with meridians.

The IDL must therefore be observed in conjunction with the Earth's time zones: on crossing it in either direction, the calendar date is adjusted by one day.