frum orthodox dating Dating antarctic ice cores

The Greenland ice sheet averages almost 4000 feet thick.If we were to assume the ice sheet has been accumulating at this rate since its beginning, it would take less than 1000 years for it to form and the recent-creation model might seem to be vindicated. In making our calculations, we did not take into account the compaction of the snow into ice as it is weighted down by the snow above.Neither did we consider the thinning of ice layers as the tremendous weight above forces the ice at lower levels to squeeze out horizontally.

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It is not uncommon to read that ice cores from the polar regions contain records of climatic change from the distant past.

Research teams from the United States, the Soviet Union, Denmark, and France have bored holes over a mile deep into the ice near the poles and removed samples for analysis in their laboratories.

This is possible because of the large precipitation rates in Greenland and the preservation of the annual effects. About a dozen historical volcanic eruptions are evident in the ice core from Crete in central Greenland.

It is also possible with a high degree of accuracy to cross check the counting of annual layers with occasional peaks in acidity and particulates from the fallout of historic volcanic events. (1978) have correlated the peaks in the mean acidity of annual layers from 553 to 1972 A. Several unknown eruptions are also documented in the ice core record.

This is in relatively good agreement with the number of annual oscillations of O currently observed in Greenland cores.

Although occasional ambiguities occur, it is relatively easy to count annual layers downward from the surface through considerable depths in the Greenland ice sheet.

We would expect considerably higher precipitation rates immediately following the Flood.

The layers of ice near the bottom of the core should be thicker than expected by the uniformitarian model and contain unusual excursions in ðO, acidity, and particulates from levels higher in the core.

The Soviet Antarctic Expeditions at Vostok in East Antarctica recovered an ice core which was almost 7,000 feet long in a region where the total ice thickness is about 12,000 feet (Lorius, et al., 1979; Lorius, et al., 1985).

Since the current precipitation rate is so much less than Greenland (on the order of one inch per year) the crude calculation of age, without corrections for compression and horizontal motion for the lowest layers is more than 100,000 years.

However, such estimates are critically based on the assumption that the accumulation rate has not varied greatly over the past.