Budak pakai speak bogel

For instance, the word for 'money' is written as wang in Malaysia, but uang in Indonesia, the word for 'try' is written as cuba in Malaysia, but coba in Indonesia, the word for 'because' is written as kerana in Malaysia, but karena in Indonesia, while the word for 'cake' is written as kuih in Malaysia, but kue in Indonesia.One notable difference in punctuation between the two languages is the use of different decimal marks; Indonesian, influenced by Dutch, uses the decimal comma, where the words are pronounced as spelt and enunciation tends to be clipped, staccato and faster than on the Malay Peninsula, which is spoken at a more languorous pace.The Indonesian and Standard Malay forms of the Indonesian languages are generally mutually intelligible, but differ in spelling, grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary.

Indonesian is the national language which serves as the unifying language of Indonesia.The term "Malay" is reserved for the language indigenous to the Malay people.The Malay language in Indonesia and Malaysia also differs in recognition and general perception by the people and government of the two countries.Ignorance of these subtleties may result in misconceptions.Between 19, the term Bahasa Melayu was used instead of Bahasa Malaysia, until the latter was reinstated, in order to instil a sense of belonging among Malaysians of all races, rather than just Malays.

Therefore, there is no clear distinction between the use of the term Malay (Bahasa Melayu) and the national language of Malaysia (Bahasa Malaysia).In Malaysia, the terms "Indonesian Malay" and "Malaysian Malay" are sometimes used for Indonesian and Malay as spoken in Malaysia.In Indonesia, "Indonesian Malay" refers to the Malay spoken by the Malay people in Indonesia, that is, to Malay as a regional language in Sumatra, though it is rarely used.The regionalized and localized varieties of Malay can become a catalyst for intercultural conflict, especially in higher education.To non-native speakers the two varieties may seem identical, but to native speakers, the differences are noticeable through diction and accent.During the 20th century, Malay written with Roman letters, known as Rumi, almost completely replaced Jawi in everyday life.