dating a guy thats always busy Backdating legal definition

In addition to being illegal, backdating isn't always a sure thing.

The general reason companies backdate options is to create a lower exercise price, which in turn increases the probability that exercising the options will make more money for the optionee.

For instance, if the board meeting is on January 3, 2012, and Company XYZ stock closes at per share that day, then the exercise price of John's 2012 stock are backdated, then his exercise price is only per share.He pays the per share exercise price and can turn around and sell those shares on the exchange for each, netting a profit of per share, or ,000.For those with an hour to kill thinking about the issues, Jeffrey Kwall and Stuart Duhl wrote an excellent article on backdating that was published in Business Lawyer in 2008.For a shorter piece with a few practical tips see Backdating – it’s illegal isn’t it?Setting aside such issues, avoiding unwanted side effects of backdating contracts can be tricky, especially when the purported effective date of an agreement is several months before the date it was actually signed, as can be seen in involves the ownership of a promissory note that was made to a bank in connection with a loan.

The facts are a bit complicated, involving circumstances surrounding the failure of a bank and transactions in the bank’s loans preceding the failure as well as transactions of the FDIC as the bank’s receiver.There are any number of contexts where this comes up — some legitimate and others not exactly aboveboard — but the logistics of negotiating and signing contracts are such that the issue is unavoidable.(Jason Mark Anderman illustrates the logistics problem well in this comment to a backdating post on Ken Adams’s blog.) There’s nothing inherently illegal or unethical about backdating contracts, although backdating can certainly be both unethical and illegal, depending on the situation.Lawyers who were trained in commonwealth jurisdictions may have an ingrained concept that backdating a document is generally improper, if not illegal.This is reflected in the Linklaters article Execution of Documents: Five Common Questions Answered, which offers the following advice for in-house lawyers: “(i) contracts may only be backdated, absent fraud, in circumstances where an original form has been lost or where terms have been fully agreed but signatures have been left to a later date and (ii) deeds may never be backdated.” Unfortunately, the article offers scant authority, and a search on Google reveals little else on the subject from the commonwealth world.You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.